IHG Symposium celebrates the Work of Y.W. Kan

Y.W. Kan’s pioneering research into the hemoglobinopathies sickle cell anemia and thalassemia has widely impacted genetic research, diagnostics, and treatment of human disease. The Institute for Human Genetics is proud to recognize Y.W. Kan with a symposium honoring his decades-long contributions.

Y.W. Kan arrived at UCSF in the 1970s when he and many others (including Herb Boyer and Bishop & Varmus) helped usher in the era of molecular genetics. With long-time collaborator Andrée Dozy, he discovered the first polymorphism in human DNA by Southern blot analysis in 1978, launching the ability to map genes on human chromosomes.

He and another long-time collaborator, Judy Chang, used those same techniques in 1979 to show how missing genes cause disease. He is the recipient of many national and international awards for his contributions. He continues to investigate the treatment of these diseases using stem cell and iPS cell therapies.

The Symposium will feature presentations from James Gusella, Katherine High, Dennis Lo, Bertram Lubin, Robert Nussbaum, Stuart Orkin, and Griffin Rodgers. Stuart Orkin will be featured as the 2015 Charles J. and Lois B. Epstein Visiting Professor.

Featured topics will include gene mapping, gene therapy, hemoglobinopathies, and non-invasive prenatal testing.

Join us in honoring genetics pioneer Y.W. Kan

The IHG Symposium will be held November 2, 2015 at 1:00-6:30 in Cole Hall on the UCSF Parnassus campus and will include a poster session and awards.

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IHG Symposium

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